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Welcome to The Brown Brontë blog!


Welcome to The Brown Brontë blog! 
As a South Asian Yorkshirewoman with an addiction to literature, the name for this blog reflects both myself and the content I’ll be sharing on here. I read when I know I should be doing other things, and I talk incessantly about what I’m reading to anyone who will humour me, when I know they should be doing other things. But since I don’t have the will or inclination to change my ways, I’ve decided to channel my thoughts on here; as some wise person once said, “If you can’t beat it, own it.”
I would love this little corner of the Internet that I’ve claimed, to be somewhere that fellow readers, both like-minded and unlike-minded, can come together for ideas on what to read, how to expand their reading, and have a natter about everything bookish, in the comments section and on our Facebook group.
And if anything I write here helps any of you lovely people to find inspiration in your reading lives, I’ll be - to coin a Yorkshire phrase - “well chuffed!”
In the upcoming posts, I’ll be sharing reviews and recommendations, thoughts on my current reading material, and the titles I’d like to read next. I can’t wait to get started and put my book-related musings on paper, and I hope you’ll take the time to join in the discussion by sharing your thoughts and reading lists too!
See you soon, 
Shabnam (The Brown Brontë) 

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