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The Good, The Bleak & The Unread: What I read in April & What's on my List in May

I don't know about you, readers, but after an initial surge, I for one have found it pretty hard to concentrate on reading - or writing - lately. Other book-bloggers who have got through 12 books or more in a month - how?! I have however rounded up what I have managed to get through over the past few weeks and  what I'm looking forward to reading in May.

April Wrap-up:


Title: The Last Man 
Author: Mary Shelley
Lots of people have been talking about this recently. Set 60 years from now, this book follows one man's fortunes and friendships while mankind is in the process of being wiped out by a pandemic. The faint glimmer of hope Shelley eventually holds out doesn't stop this from being bleak, bleak, bleak. Give it a miss if you're feeling fragile.

Title: Hashim & Family
Author: Shahnaz Ahsan
A thoughtful look at migration, belonging and racism through the experiences of one family's experiences in Manchester and Bangladesh. This is John Murray's lead fiction debut for 2020.



Title: 'Exterminate All The Brutes'
Author: Sven Lindqvist
Every so often I take a break from fiction to stretch other parts of my brain. Lindqvist's unflinching examination of the ideological roots of European genocide gave me lots to think about and critique.




Title: The Ten Thousand Doors of January 
Author: Alix E. Harrow
Imaginative, adventurous, humorous, ironic. Just what I needed to get myself out of my reading funk. 

May To-Be-Read List: 

In May I'm trying to read more S. Asian writers, starting with the following:


Title: You Beneath Your Skin
Author: Damyanti Biswas
An atmospheric crime thriller that explores poverty, misogyny and political corruption in New Delhi. I'm partway through this right now and finding it gripping so far. All author proceeds from this book go to two New Delhi nonprofits that work for the empowerment of women and children, Stop Acid Attacks and ProjectWhy. Stay tuned for a review coming soon.


Title: To Lahore With Love
Author: Hina Belitz
A lot of my reading list lately has been quite dark and heavy, so I picked this because the cover looks optimistic and fun. Yes, I judged a book by its cover! It's a journey of discovery and identity through stories, food and faith for Irish-Pakistani Addy, which takes her - and the reader to Lahore, a city I'd love to visit.


Title: The Unlikely Adventures of the Shergill Sisters
Author: Balli Kaur
I'm looking forward to some much-needed humour and warmth from this roadtrip across India with three sisters, as they attempt to carry out their late mother's final rites. From the author of Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows.

Thanks to Netgalley, John Murray Press, Mr B's Emporium, @damyantiwrites 💝


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